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WINTER IS HERE – SO ARE TICKS!

On deer, mice, chipmunks...

By: Rika Keck

June and July are peak months for tick bites, yet ticks are around all year. Some survive the winter months, and thus one must be vigilant with tick checks. This year, we are experiencing a mild winter in the NE. This is alarming as ticks do not die in a milder climate, and we can actually get a tick bite during outdoor activities. The white-footed mice, major tick carriers, are running around outside, and squeeze into basements of our homes. Be cautious when discarding mouse traps with a ‘victim.’

Ticks know no borders and respect no boundaries. A patient’s county of residence does not accurately reflect his or her Lyme disease risk because people travel, pets travel, and ticks travel. This creates a dynamic situation with many opportunities for exposure to Lyme disease for each individual. Just today Justin Bieber announced that he has been sick with Lyme disease (and mono).

According to information from the Global Lyme Alliance: One tick bit can transfer up to 15 infections. This can include Lyme disease, but also other bacteria, parasites and viruses. Transfer of certain infections can happen within 10 minutes, e.g. the Powassan virus, while other infections take longer to be transmitted.

The longer a tick is attached, the greater the risk of acquiring multiple infections. 

As a health practitioner knowledgeable about the above, I suggest to consider botanical or homeopathic supplementation as prophylaxis against other potential pathogens when prescribed short-term Doxycycline for an acute tick bite. This could include, e.g. Artesminin, or Cryptolepsis for parasitic co-infections, or Houytunia for symptoms associated with a Bartonella infection.

In an acute setting, antibiotic treatment is the first line of treatment for Lyme disease.

So while you are out and about in the winter months, especially the unseasonably warmer winter months, consider using a (natural and non-toxic) tick-repellent when going hiking or playing in natural grasses. Better be safe than sorry.

Contact me for more information, or sign up for my newsletter, 

Rika


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